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BAC Canberra Exports: Fire & Ice Pack for FS2004/FS9

Canberra Exports: Fire and Ice pack for FS9

Flying Stations is proud to present part six of a new series of English Electric/BAC/GAF Canberra models for FS9/FS2004. This pack covers Canberra bomber canopy exports for Australia, Rhodesia, Ethiopia and Sweden- the B.Mk.20, B.2 (Rhodesia), B.52 and Tp.52. Download the pack below, and check out the full list of features here (including SP2 updates).

Credits:

Steve Beeny - Models, textures, FDE, web guru
The WT333 Operating Team- Sound recordings
John Sheehan, Henk Schuitemaker - Beta Testing


English Electric/BAC/GAF Canberra Exports: Fire & Ice Contents:

Canberra B.Mk.20 for FS9

GAF Canberra B.Mk.20 bomber with 6x 500lb internal and 2x 750lb underwing bomb load

The GAF Canberra B.Mk.20 was the Australian-licensed version of the English Electric Canberra, of which production began in 1951 with a total of 48 aircraft built. The Canberra B.Mk.20 differed from the RAF Canberra B.2 in that it had the integral wing tanks seen later on B.6 and PR.7, as well as some other radio modifications and navigation aids. The last 20 of the series were fitted with the R.A.7 engine of the second generation B.6 types. It is seen here in its Vietnam service era, in which it later carried an all-American bomb load and had dispensed of its drop tanks in place of a locally-modded wingtip pylon to carry extra bombs.

In this FS version, the aircraft comes with two droppable 750lb bombs underwing and a droppable 3,000lb bomb load in the bomb bay. The Canberra B.Mk.20s depicted is A84-233, 2 Sqn. Royal Australian Air Force, on detachment with the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing, USAF, at Phan Rang Air Base, Vietnam, 1970.



Canberra B.Mk.20 for FS9

GAF Canberra B.Mk.20 bomber in clean configuration

The GAF Canberra B.Mk.20 was the Australian-licensed version of the English Electric Canberra, of which production began in 1951 with a total of 48 aircraft built. The Canberra B.Mk.20 differed from the RAF Canberra B.2 in that it had the integral wing tanks seen later on B.6 and PR.7, as well as some other radio modifications and navigation aids. The first 20 of the series were fitted with the standard Avon engine of the first generation B.2 types.

In this FS version, the aircraft comes with and jettisonable drop tanks but otherwise clean config. The Canberra B.Mk.20s depicted is A84-229 of 2 Sqn, Royal Australian Air Force, on detachment to the Aircraft Research and Development Unit (ARDU) at RAAF Edinburgh, mid 1960s and A84-218 of 1 Operational Conversion Unit, Royal Australian Air Force, based at RAAF Amberley, 1960s.

Canberra B.52 for FS9

BAC Canberra B.52 interdictor-bomber with 6x 500lb internal bombs and 2x underwing 7.62mm FN Twin MAG

The BAC Canberra B.52 had originally been developed for Venezuela, but selected for use by the Imperial Ethiopian Air Force in 1968. Four Canberra B.2s were refurbished to this mark, and delivered in 1969. 351 suffered a cockpit fire early in its career was forced to emergency land at Harar Meda AFB at Debre Zeit. This ultimately resulted in a retracted undercarriage. One pilot absconded to Somalia in a Canberra. The remaining two are believed to have given solid service against Somali ground targets in the Ogaden War of 1977. One aircraft was critically damaged in this action and lost returning to base. It is believed that Soviet ground crew took over maintenance of the Canberras after the Derg came to power and Ethiopian alliances shifted from the West. The ultimate fate of the last two machines is subject to conjecture, however reports indicate they were damaged on the ground by Eriterian separatists.

In this FS version, the aircraft comes with jettisonable underwing FN Twin MAG pods and a 3,000lb internal bomb load. The Canberra B.52s depicted are '351' and '354'of the Imperial Ethiopian Air Force, based at Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.



Canberra B.2 (Rhodesia) for FS9

English Electric Canberra B.2 bomber with 300x Alpha Bomb internal bomb and 4x 60lb under nose rockets

Rhodesia ordered 15 Canberra B.2s in 1957, and over the years made good use of their small, well-maintained fleet. Initially serving with the Royal Rhodesian Air Force, the B.2s were essentially the same as their RAF cousins, barring some radio modifications, however ingenious RRAF personnel fitted under-nose 60lb rockets to some in lieu of additional hardpoints. They excelled in their precision using these, as well as their accuracy in dive and level bombing, winning a bombing competition against British Canberra crews in the early 1960s. The fleet suffered from spar fatigue later in life, and after the split from Britain and subsequent embargo, parts were sought from South Africa. Many Canberras saw long-range and intensive anti-guerilla action throughout the 1970s. Ultimately ending up under the banner of the Air Force of Zimbabwe, a handful soldiered on until the end of the decade.

In this FS version, the aircraft comes with jettisonable wing tip drop tanks and 4x 60lb rockets. It is also depictted with a static payload of Alpha Bombs, a locally-made bouncing-bomb device. The Canberra B.2s depicted are RRAF 159 of 6 Sqn, Royal Rhodesian Air Force, New Sarum, Rhodesia and R2504 of 5 Sqn, Airforce of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe, 1981



Canberra B(I).52/82 for FS9

BAC Canberra Tp.52 Radio surveillance/special duties aircraft

Sweden was something of a special customer for the Canberra, ordering two refurbished RAF B.2s in 1960, redesignating them Tp.52s, under the label of being a 'transport aircraft'. They were actually used in semi-covert ELINT operations against Soviet threats along the Swedish border, conducting radio surveillance and other such duties. They were fitted with different noses over their 10 years of operation, typically a T.11 type nose and the so-called 'Lansen' nose adapted from the aircraft of the same name.

In this FS version, the Canberra Tp.52 is shown with jettisonable drop tanks, T.11-style nose, but otherwise clean config. The aircraft depicted is 52001 of F8 Wing, Royal Swedish Air Force, Barkaby Air Base, Sweden, early 1960s.



Model Features:

WT333 Canberra

The Flying Stations English Electric/BAC/GAFCanberra series models all feature photo-real 2D panels and highly detailed virtual cockpits, gauges, and custom sound set, recorded from the ear-spliting roar of the real RR Avon engines of surviving B(I).8/B.6(mod) Canberra, WT333. With the co-operation of Clive Davies and the superb WT333 operating team, internal and external sounds were recorded during a 'Thunder Run' at Bruntingthorpe, UK. A percentage of profits from payware downloads will go to the upkeep of WT333, so you can know that your hard-earned money will go further than just the computer screen!

NOTE: Sounds are aliased to the B.Mk.20 with bombs, so you will need to have that installed for the other models to work.

In order to familiarise pilots, the following features are available:

Autopilot 2D panel: Toggle with Shift-6.
Improved red-tint night-lighting on all 2D panels.
Jettisonable drop tanks and payloads:
Control via Stores Release panel (Shift-7). Also located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled, click once to arm, then stores/drop tank release switches to drop.
Firing gun packs (B.52 only): set to beacon/strobe light key. A gunfire sound will fire for the first second or so each time you toggle the effect
Firing 60lb rockets (B.2 Rhodesia only): set to smoke systems key for smoke effect, but Wing store 1 release for animation.
Port side battery hatch and rear equipment bay hatch open
: set to default wing fold command.
Animated variable incidence tailplane: set to elevator trim controls, and watch it move!
Opening bomb bay doors: set to default main exit command, or via Stores Release panel (Shift-7) switch.
Parked configuration: engage parking brakes to see a range of features.
Jettisonable canopy: located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled.
Working ejector seat (pilot only): located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled.
Opening DV window: located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled.
Folding rumble seat: located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled.
Animated pilot head
: turns with rudder.
Crew hatch: Exit-2 command or use handle release above hatch in VC.
Smoky cartridge starts: will fire on engine startup.


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