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BAC Canberra Exports: South America Pack for FS2004/FS9

Canberra Exports: South America pack for FS9

Flying Stations is proud to present part five of a new series of English Electric/BAC Canberra models for FS9/FS2004. This pack covers Canberra bomber canopy exports for South America- the B.Mk.62, T.Mk. 64, B(I).52/82 and T.Mk.74. Download the pack below, and check out the full list of features here (including SP2 updates).

Credits:

Steve Beeny - Models, textures, FDE, web guru
The WT333 Operating Team- Sound recordings
Bill Mackay, John Sheehan, Henk Schuitemaker, Marcelo Siri, Tony Flahant - Beta Testing


BAC Canberra Exports: South America Pack Contents:

Canberra B.Mk.62 for FS9

BAC Canberra B.Mk.62 bomber with 6x 1,000lb internal and 2x 1,000lb underwing bomb load

The B.Mk.62 was the version of Canberra created by BAC (as English Electric had then become) for the Argentine Air Force. The Argentine government had long sought the Canberra for its large, modern air force, seeing as many other south American countries had been equipped with them since the 1950s. Whitehall, however, realised the strategic value of the bomber in use against the Falklands Islands, and had held off supplying the type until 1969, when a contract was signed for ten upgraded B.2 bomber versions and two armed T.4 trainers. These would become the B.Mk.62 and T.Mk.64 respectively, and served the Argentine Air Force faithfully through the 1970s and the Falklands conflict, until retirement in 2000.

In this FS version, the aircraft comes with two droppable 1,000lb bombs underwing, a droppable 6,000lb bomb load in the bomb bay and jettisonable wing tip drop tanks. The aircraft depicted is B-108 of Grupo 2 de Bombardeo, Fuerza Aerea Argentina, based at BAM Rio Gallegos, Patagonia, Argentina, June 1982.

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Canberra B.Mk.62 for FS9

BAC Canberra B.Mk.62 bomber in 'Proyecto Pelicano' experimental radar fit

Proyecto Pelicano was a locally-devised project conceived in 1980, as part of a greater reconditioning and upgrading scheme for many of the Argentine Canberras. The need came from the lack of more modern navigation and radio aids for the fleet, and so five aircraft were selected to go to Area Material Rio Cuarto for this new fit. Work commenced, and part of this project was the inclusion of a Bendix/King RDR1400 radar system mounted under the nose in a pelican-like faring. Several of the aircraft were thus equipped by the outbreak of the Falklands conflict, although not all had the actual avionics systems for the navigator fully finished by this time. Test flights were flown in April 1982, and the pilot consistently reported a general instability caused by airflow disruptions from the nose radome. Mk.62 B-101 did fly several combat sorties with the radome fitted, however, when a second Pelicano aircraft, B-104, crashed, the project was scrapped, as it was believed the modifications were the root of the problem.

In this FS version, the aircraft comes with the nose radome and clean configuration. The aircraft depicted is B-102 'Pelicano II' of Grupo 2 de Bombardeo, Fuerza Aerea Argentina, based at BAM Parana, Entre Rios, Argentina, January 1982.

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Canberra B.Mk.62 for FS9

B.Mk.62 bomber with light stores fit

Later in their service life, some of the Mk.62 Canberras were locally-modified to take additional reconnaisance cameras and an array of light underwing stores. The revised recon fit was a direct result of the Falklands conflict; a contract had been placed with BAC in 1981 for two new upgraded aircraft and possibly two upgraded ex- PR.3 reconnaisance Canberras, however the arms embargo after the war effectively ended these prospects. The technicians of the Argentine Air Force proved time and again to be very adaptable and innovative, and so added internal cameras fore, aft and externally into a modified drop tank so as to serve as a recon pod. Thus in the 1990s, it was not uncommon to see Argentine Canberras serving in this recon role, and sometimes with a Light Stores Carrier (LSC) under the opposite wing (see inset image). At this point, the surviving fleet were repainted in a new lo-viz scheme with no visible serial numbers; a decision believed to have been designed to confuse Chile as to how many Canberras the Argentine Air Force had operational.

In this FS version, the aircraft comes with jettisonable TRW recon pod carrying Krv8/24 cameras and Light Stores Carrier pod. The aircraft depicted is B-101 of Grupo 2 de Bombardeo, Fuerza Aerea Argentina, based at BAM Parana, Entre Rios, Argentina, 1999.

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Canberra T.Mk.64 for FS9

BAC Canberra T.Mk.64 crew trainer and bomber with 2x 1,000lb underwing bomb load

The T.Mk.64 was an upgraded version of the classic RAF T.4 crew trainer. Two were ordered in 1969, serials B-111 and B-112, and provided the Argentine Air Force with both a crew trainer and fully bomber-capable additition to their Canberra fleet. The Mk.64s had a revised radio fit, with UHF and HF radio atennae, along with provision for the normal internal bomb load of a B.2, but also pylons for under wing stores as with many of the later export Canberras. Both aircraft served during the Falklands conflict in courier, reconnaisance and bomber roles, proving their worth many times.

In this FS version, the aircraft comes with jettisonable wing tip drop tanks and 2x 1,000lb underwing bombs. The aircraft depicted is B-111 of Grupo 2 de Bombardeo, Fuerza Aerea Argentina, based at BAM Rio Gallegos, Patagonia, Argentina, June 1982.

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Canberra B(I).52/82 for FS9

BAC Canberra B(I).52/82 interdictor/bomber with gun pack and 4x underwing Matra rocket pods

The Venezuelan air force was the first true export customer for the Canberra, and began in 1953 with an order for the B.2 bomber type. Of this initial batch, three survivors returned to BAC for conversion to B(I).52 interdictor standard in 1968. This gave them a revised radio and navigation fit as well as underwing pylons and provision for the 20mm cannon gun pack as seen on the RAF interdictor Canberras. Then, in 1978, these B(I).52s, along with other FAV B.52s returned to BAC for further upgrades and airframe overhauls, becoming B(I).82s and B.82s in turn.

In this FS version, the aircraft come with firing twin Matra rocket pods underwing and jettisonable wing tip drop tanks. In addition, they are fitted with a firing 20mm cannon gun pack in the rear of the bomb bay. Aircraft depicted are 1529 and 1280, of Ecuadron de Bombardeo No.39, Grupo Aereo de Bombardeo No.13, Fuerza Aerea Venezolana, Barcelona AB, Venezuela, March 1983 and December 1973 respectively.

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Canberra T.Mk.74 for FS9

BAC Canberra T.Mk.74 crew trainer

The Peruvian air force (FAP) was another early customer for the Canberra, and over the years operated a mixed bag of primarily fighter canopy variants, but also several bomber canopy versions and trainers. Among the latter was the T.Mk.74 crew trainer, which had a revised radio fit and capability for bomb bay stores over the RAF T.4, but not the underwing store capability of the Argentine T.Mk.64. These aircraft helped train crews for the various B.72s, B(I).56s and B(I) type bombers/interdictors operated by the FAP for decades, until their final retirement in 2002. FAP Canberras hold the distinction of being the last to drop bombs in anger, when B(I).68s were used in the Alta Cenepa war in 1995.

In this FS version, the aircraft comes in clean config. Aircraft depicted are 232 and 248 of Grupo Aereo 9, Fuerza Aerea del Peru, based at Pisco, Peru, in the 1970s and 1991 respectively.

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Model Features:

WT333 Canberra

The Flying Stations Canberra series models all feature photo-real 2D panels and highly detailed virtual cockpits, gauges, and custom sound set, recorded from the ear-spliting roar of the real RR Avon engines of surviving B(I).8/B.6(mod) Canberra, WT333. With the co-operation of Clive Davies and the superb WT333 operating team, internal and external sounds were recorded during a 'Thunder Run' at Bruntingthorpe, UK. A percentage of profits from payware downloads will go to the upkeep of WT333, so you can know that your hard-earned money will go further than just the computer screen!

NOTE: Sounds are aliased to the B.62 with bombs, so you will need to have that installed for the other models to work.

In order to familiarise pilots, the following features are available:

Autopilot 2D panel: Toggle with Shift-6.
Improved red-tint night-lighting on all 2D panels.
Jettisonable drop tanks and payloads
located inside virtual cockpit, toggle arming switch then press stores switch to release.
Matra rocket pods (B(I).52 and 82 only) set to smoke systems on switch.
Hispano 20mm cannon gun pack (B(I).52 and 82 only) set to strobe light on switch.
Port side battery hatch and rear equipment bay hatch open
: set to default wing fold command.
Animated variable incidence tailplane: set to elevator trim controls, and watch it move!
Opening bomb bay doors: set to default main exit command.
Parked configuration: engage parking brakes to see a range of features.
Jettisonable canopy: located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled.
Working ejector seat (pilot only): located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled.
Opening DV window: located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled.
Folding rumble seat: located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled.
Animated pilot head
: turns with rudder.
Crew hatch: Exit-2 command or use handle release above hatch in VC.


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