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BAC/English Electric Canberra Master of Tasks Pack
for FS2004/FS9

Canberra Master of Tasks pack for FS9

Flying Stations is proud to present the final pack of the of the BAC/English Electric Canberra series for FS9/FS2004. This pack covers test-bed, experimental and photo-reconnaissance Canberra roles, including the PR.3/7, B.6 (mod), T.22 models. General handling Pilot's Notes for the types included in this pack are covered in pre-existing pack Pilot's Notes, and relevant links are provided below. Specific notes relating to new features in the Master of Tasks pack can be read in the support page of our forum at the link below.

Credits:

Steve Beeny - Models, textures, FDE, web guru
The WT333 Operating Team- Sound recordings
Henk Schuitemaker, John Sheehan, Marcelo Siri - Beta Testing

English Electric Canberra Master of Tasks Pack Contents:

Canberra B.1 with DH Spectre engine for FS9

English Electric Canberra B.1 test-bed with DH Spectre rocket engine

English Electric Canberra B.1 VN813 was one of the four prototypes produced in 1949, and had been fitted with Rolls Royce Nene engines of 5,000lb thrust each as an insurance policy should the Avon engine fall behind schedule. Following trials work with RR in 1951, it was sold on to De Havilland Motors in June 1953, where it was later converted to be a test bed for the new DH Spectre rocket engine. This was a fully-throttleable engine capable of 8,000lb thrust, and was fitted below and behind the centerline of the aircraft, aft of the bomb bay. It first displayed at the 1957 SBAC air show, however, due to the larger drag characteristics produced by the Nene engine nacelles, its Mach clearance was slightly lower than that of its competitor the Napier Scorpion engine housed in a standard Canberra B.2. Consequently it was not able to produce the same results, and in combination with the Ministry of Defence White Paper that year announcing the switch from manned fighter defence to missiles, the project was cancelled in 1960 at the reported cost of £5.75 million.

VN813, as based at the DH Motors facility at Hatfield, is supplied here with two liveries, that of its original Bomber Command 1 two-tone scheme, and the later SBAC display colours.

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Canberra B.2 with Bristol Olympus 102 engines for FS9

English Electric Canberra B.2 test-bed with Bristol Olympus 102 engines

English Electric Canberra B.2 WD952, was another engine test bed aircraft, this time used for the Bristol Olympus series. It is shown here for FS with its final fit of the more powerful 102 series engine, capable of producing 12,000lb thrust. With this fit, it reached the world altitude record of 65,890ft as flown by Wg Cdr Wally Gibb in August 1955. It suffered critical damage after a crash in 1956, was broken up later that year.

In this FS version, WD952 is shown in its original Bomber Command 1 two-tone scheme, based at Bristol Engine Co., Filton, August 1955

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Canberra PR.3 for FS9

English Electric Canberra PR.3 high-altitude photo-reconnaissance aircraft

Following the Air Ministry issued Specification PR.31/46, the English Electric Canberra PR.3 was introduced to service in 1953, as a dedicated reconnaissance version of the B.2. It was 14 inches longer than the B.2 so as to accomodate a camera bay forward of the bomb bay. The bomb bay itself was divided in two, the forward section now housing an additional fuel tank and the latter housing a flare bay for PR work. While a solid performer in its new role, only 39 examples were built before the more powerful PR.7 was introduced. Two ex-RAF PR.3s were sold to Venezuela as the PR.53, but beyond this, no other foreign sales were procured.

In this FS version, the aircraft comes with jettisonable wing tip drop tanks, long range ferry tank, working camera hatches and opening flare bay. Aircraft depicted are WE139, of 540 Sqn, based at RAF Wyton, October 1953, WE137, of 39 Sqn, seen at Ta'Qali, Malta, August 1958, WE136, of 231 OCU, based at RAF Bassingbourn, September 1963 and 2444, of Escuadron 39, Fuerza Aerea Venezolana, based at Barcelona AB, July 1973

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Canberra B.6 clear air turbulence trials fit for FS9

English Electric Canberra B.6 (mod) clear air turbulence trials aircraft

The English Electric Canberra B.6 was, like the B.2 before it, used for numerous trials projects. This particular B.6 (mod), XH568, was modified for to measure the phenomenon known as clear air turbulence (CAT), which occurred at high altitude, particularly over mountainous terrain and in seemingly clear air. An elongated nose probe was fitted along with a weather radar in one tip tank and a 16mm camera in the other. XH568 initially worked for the MoD, and along with assignments to Middle East, she was deployed to Buckley, Colorado for CAT assignment in the mid 1960s. She was later modified again with a long rounded nose cone for work with the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Bedford.

XH568 for FS comes with data recording gear in the bomb bay but otherwise clean configuration. She is depicted with an overall white and day glo orange scheme that she wore in the RAE, whilst based at Buckley AB, Colorado, USA in the mid 1960s.

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Canberra B.6 (mod) RC for FS9

English Electric Canberra B.6 (mod) RC ELINT/special duties aircraft

The English Electric Canberra B.6 (mod) was a much modified version of the B.6 used exclusively on 51 Sqn, Royal Air Force for ELINT and other special duties during the Cold War. WT305 was one of four such B.6s, which came on strength of 51 Sqn in March 1961. and in this case featured a special fitting containing sensors to record the infra-red signature of Soviet fighter aircraft, thus giving it the 'RC' suffix. It is possible some of this equipment was American-supplied. Not a great deal of hard fact is known about 51 Sqns ops with the Canberra, other than they flew out to northern Sweden and along the Russian border, deliberately provoking the Soviet air defence in to sending up fighters so as to gather data. It is also believed they carried recording gear in the bomb bay to monitor Soviet radio transmissions for analysis back in the UK. The exact nature of what was carried in the nose cone is open to speculation as the data still remains classified. The four B.6 (mods) retired in 1976 to be replaced by Nimrod R.1s.

In this FS version, the B.6 (mod) comes with IR sensor 'dustbin', wing tip drop tanks, canopy sunblind for use in the Mediterranean theatre and black box gear in the bomb bay. Aircraft depicted is WT305 'X' of 51 Sqn, Royal Air Force, based at RAF Wyton, early 1970s.

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Canberra B(I).8/B.6 (mod) for FS9

English Electric Canberra B(I).8/B.6 (mod) trials installation aircraft

The English Electric Canberra B(I).8/B.6 (mod) was a one-off hybrid test bed aircraft, WT333. Built in 1956 as a B(I).8 interdictor, she never saw squadron service, and instead was transferred to several establishments over its long career performing weapons trials, including LABS, and other special duties. Some of this work was with the A&AEE for rocket firing and stores release trials. In 1966 was involved in atomic cloud sampling at Woomera, Australia, but was later returned to the UK, for service with the Royal Radar Establishment at Pershore. In 1972 she was converted into a B.6 (mod) (of sorts!) with an elongated nose cone for use in radar trials work with the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Bedford. It was she received the 'raspberry ripple' paintwork she still wears today. Sold to the Classic Aviation Projects in 1995, WT333 was later purchased by private owners, and is lovingly preserved by a small but dedicated team, who keep her in engine-running condition at Bruntingthorpe. Several 'Thunder Runs' are made annually, and it was during one of these in 2010 that a sound set was recorded for the Flying Stations Canberra series. She recently celebrated her 60th anniversary and we hope for many more years to come.

In this FS version, the WT333 comes with jettisonable tip tanks and specially adapted bomb bay doors for trials work. She is depicted in her raspberry ripple paintwork, based at Bruntingthorpe, 2012.

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Canberra PR.7 for FS9

English Electric Canberra PR.7 high/low-altitude photo-reconnaissance aircraft

The English Electric Canberra PR.7 was the successor to the PR.3, and like the B.6, was fitted with the more powerful Avon RA.7 engines delivering 7,500lb thrust. As also with the B.6, the PR.7 contained the wet wing, giving it additional range over the PR.3 along with its already copious fuel load. The PR.7 began equipping RAF squadrons in 1954, and was soon to operate in RAF Germany, the NEAF and FEAF, providing much needed reconnaisance support in the latter theatre during Operation Planter's Punch during the Malayan Emergency. Throughout its long service life however it served a useful role at home and abroad, ending its days as with all non-PR.9 Canberras, at RAF Wyton with 100 and 39 Sqns.

In this FS version, the aircraft comes with jettisonable tip tanks, droppable para-flares and working camera hatches. Aircraft depicted are WH798 of 80 Sqn, based at RAF(G) Laarbruch, Germany, Sep. 1960, WH779 of 100 Sqn, based at RAF Wyton, late 1980s, WT538 of 13 Sqn, based at RAF Wyton, September 1981 and IP990 of 106 Sqn, Indian Air Force, as seen at Yelahanka during Aero India 2005.

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Canberra PR.7 clear air turbulence test-bed for FS9

English Electric Canberra PR.7 clear air turbulence trials aircraft

English Electric Canberra PR.7 WH793 was originally built as a PR.7 in 1954, but was later converted into the prototype PR.9 with RA.24 engines and extended wing area. After fulfilling this task, she was converted back to the original wing shape but retained the uprated engines of the PR.9 along with a new nose cone fitting for clear air turbulence trial work. She also was fitted with a weather radar in one tip tank and a 16mm camera in the other. She was taken on charge at RAE Bedford circa 1965, but performed much of this C.A.T. work over the western United States, totalling 15 data-gathering flights.

In this FS version, the aircraft comes with jettisonable tip tanks and data-recording gear in the bomb bay. WH793 is depicted wearing the colours of the Royal Aircraft Establishment 'Aero Flight', based at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field NAS, California, February 1967.

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Canberra T.22 for FS9

BAC Canberra T.22 radar intercept crew trainer

The BAC Canberra T.22 was built as a requirement for the Royal Navy to provide upcoming Blackburn Buccaneer crews with training on the Blue Parrot radar system. With surplus PR.7s becoming available in 1969, several of these were sent to Marshalls in Cambridge for converting to T.22 standard, with the first flight taking place in 1973. The main visual differences were removal of tip tanks and fitting of an elongated nose cone very similar to that of the Buccaneer to house the radar. Internal equipment was added for the Blue Parrot system, and power supplies upgraded to support all this new gear. Camera hatches were sealed and the flare bay adapted to house the master reference gyro. Delivery began in 1973 to RNAS Yeovilton, where the Fleet Requirements and Directions Unit (FRADU) was based. The T.22 fleet was operated until the late 1980s when replaced by Dassault Falcon aircraft.

Note: the T.22 manufacter is listed as 'BAC', as by 1960 English Electric had become part of the new British Aircraft Corporation merger.

In this FS version, the T.22 comes with master reference gyro in the flare bay. Aircraft depicted are WH803, '856' of FRADU, Royal Navy, RNAS Yeovilton, 1985 and WT510, '854' of FRADU, Royal Navy, RNAS Yeovilton, June 1977

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Model Features:

WT333 Canberra

The Flying Stations Canberra series models all feature photo-real 2D panels and highly detailed virtual cockpits, gauges, and custom sound set, recorded from the ear-spliting roar of the real RR Avon engines of surviving B(I).8/B.6(mod) Canberra, WT333. With the co-operation of Clive Davies and the superb WT333 operating team, internal and external sounds were recorded during a 'Thunder Run' at Bruntingthorpe, UK. A percentage of profits from payware downloads will go to the upkeep of WT333, so you can know that your hard-earned money will go further than just the computer screen!

NOTE: Sounds are aliased to the PR.3, so you will need to have that installed for the other models to work.

In order to familiarise pilots, the following features are available:

PR.7 Flare release: Control via Photo recce/stores release panel (Shift-7). Also located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled, click once to arm, again to release.
PR.3/7 Camera view/pilot view:
Control via Photo recce/stores release panel (Shift-7).
PR.3/7 Camera hatch open/close:
Control via Photo recce/stores release panel (Shift-7). Also located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled
Autopilot 2D panel:
Toggle with Shift-6.
Jettisonable drop tanks and payloads: Control via Stores Release panel (Shift-7). Also located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled, click once to arm, then stores/drop tank release switches to drop.
Port side battery hatch and rear equipment bay hatch open (all): set to default wing fold command.
Animated variable incidence tailplane: set to elevator trim controls, and watch it move!
Opening bomb bay/flare bay doors: set to default main exit command.
Parked configuration: engage parking brakes to see a range of features.
Jettisonable canopy: located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled.
Working ejector seat (pilot only): located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled.
Opening DV window: located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled.
Folding rumble seat: located inside virtual cockpit, switch toggled.
Animated pilot head
: turns with rudder.
Crew hatch: Exit-2 command or use handle release above hatch in VC.
Smoky cartridge starts: will fire on engine startup.


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